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BAS Message
October 2019

The Boston Symphony live broadcasts on the internet are a treasure for music lovers and audiophiles. I don’t know of any other service like this: weekly live broadcasts and lightly compressed sound. They use many microphones so the sound you hear is the product of the mixing console, usually too much announcer and too much soloist for my taste, too sibilant announcer, but otherwise you can just sit back and enjoy. It is at 192 kbps. The download on demand has returned after a year’s hiatus -- it is at 128 kbps but with the advantage that you avoiding real time streaming issues.

www.classicalwcrb.org/

Webmaster's NOTE: There are SEPARATE, MULTIPLE streams available, for example The Boston Symphony Ochestra, Boston Early Music Stream, The BSO Concert Channel, The Bach Channel.

To download PAST Programs:
www.classicalwcrb.org/programs/past-bso-broadcasts#stream/0

I measured 70 dB dynamic range for a recent concert (Sept 21). I took the ratio of the loudest music—full scale-- with flat response, to the “H” weighted level of the quietist passage (“H” weighting is the curve corresponding to the 20 dB Fletcher Munson curve which I approximate by an 18 dB per octave Butterworth high pass filter at 500Hz).

I estimate 10 dB of compression on typical symphonic fare.

I contribute to WGBH (they own WCRB) and the Boston Symphony


email me here


 

The Boston Audio Society
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problems? email Barry: webmaster@bostonaudiosociety.org

updated 10/12/19